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S/V Silent Sun | All Rights Reserved

Silent Sun Crosses the Pacific


The crossing. A 34 day journey, across an ocean, 3,000 miles- on a 37 foot boat, with a dog and 2 other people. You want me to put that into words? Hmmm…

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Was it scary? Never. Was it boring? No. Was it exciting? Sometimes.

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It really wasn’t like anything I expected. And an experience that is hard to explain. But overall it was a whole lot of fun, it was psychologically challenging, and awe-inspiring. There were long days, and there were exciting as hell days. Time went by fast while we were sailing hard, and slow as paint drying when we were becalmed for about a week in total. Our passage was not like we expected. After reading countless blogs, articles, books, and every other kind of print about this trip- we didn’t expect to see any other boats the entire time (we saw at least one a day during week 2 and 3.. and even got to tour a tuna boat!), we didn’t expect to see much wildlife (we had birds with us everyday of the trip, even bow riding dolphins 4 or 5 different times), and we definitely didn’t think it would take 34 days! Ok, well our boat is fully loaded with dive gear, camera gear, 8 months of provisions, 3 people, and all their shit… you get the point. But we did expect to be in the range of other crossings around 28-30 days. That’s ok.  We like winning the slow record- just means we’re super salty.

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Since our crossing averaged more light wind days than not, it set the pace for our crossing all the way around. I wasn’t sure if I was going to get the chance to cook many meals- we had a fresh meal daily, we ate very well the entire trip. The boat didn’t break nearly as much as it could, and we always felt in control. The conditions made our daily activities easier than it could have been.

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But saying that… every activity was still a challenge in it’s own. That was a big thing about being on a boat for 34 days straight…. It. Doesn’t. Stop. Moving.

The motion of the waves and the swell… and the boat, send every muscle into a flex at each movement. If you want to know what it’s like you can try it at home- just add these things on to your daily activities – Bend your knees, engage your stomach muscles, sway back and forth like your surfing a gnar wave, and then add at least an extra hour to each activity- while cooking, eating, reading, laundry.. and even sleeping! Crealock 37, pacific puddle jump,

We do have stories of swimming with spotted dolphin, equator parties, boatcersizing, a case of rotten potatoes, a nasty gale, the random tuna boat encounter, and so much more… but they will just have to wait for now. Please enjoy these pics if they ever get to load… and hopefully the suspense has been built up for blogs to come.

Day 30 apples and potatoes!

Day 30 apples and potatoes!

We are headed to the Tuamotus this weekend and will update you all again as soon as we can. Ha! But until then, we will be diving with hundreds of sharks (that’s a great thing!), indulging in our passion of UW photography, probably working on the boat a lot, and overall having a kickass time.

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Comments (6)

  1. Dareth Newley

    This is so amazing to see more pictures and read your story. Mike tells me that from Nuku Hiva to Tuamotus it’s 580 nautical miles. We’ll be keeping up with you on Google Maps. Happy sailing and exploring. We love you

    Reply
  2. kristinereneephotography

    Love you, Jess! Thanks for keeping us posted on your adventure (also known as your life!)! So thankful that you’re safe and that spirits are good! The stories and photos are amazing and I can’t wait to hear about the work you’re doing. Lottsa hugs!

    Reply

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