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Turtle Bay -> Abreojos


After 5 days, 2 hangovers and one offshore mega-storm (that we were hiding from), it was finally time to leave Bahia Tortuga. We could have hung out for longer. We were making really good friends and our Spanish was getting better everyday, since nobody really spoke English, but there aren’t really any animals here for us to shoot (with a camera) or ongoing conservation projects to film. Also, whale season is rapidly coming to a close and we have prior engagements to meet up with an ecotourism initiative for some filming in the south, so on we go.

Isaias, one of our surfer friends, heard that we were getting ready to leave the next day and told us that his dad was living at a fish camp down by Bahia Asuncion. Any chance we could take him and Antonio down the coast and drop them off? Honesty, I was a little worried. I had seen maps of that part of the coast and I knew there was no hiding from the swell. A system had just passed two days before and we were sure to see a few remnants of it out there. Isaias was pretty confident that the little bay would be of some protection and that the ground would hold our anchor, so we said “OK” and loaded them up at 0830 the next morning.

Isaias living it up at sea

Isaias living it up at sea

Both of the guys seemed to have an awesome time on our daysail together. They brought some Lobster to grub on and helped us raise sails and whatever else needed to be done. All in all, it was a really great day. The swell was ok at best, but the wind was steady and the windvane was steering us straight and true with its new, pefectly trimmed safety tube.

Isaias's fish camp south of Turtle Bay

Isaias’s fish camp south of Turtle Bay

5 hours or so later we saw a little cove that provided the Pescaderos with the protection they needed to launch their boats and offload their catch.  Unfortuantely, as I had susected, it was shit for sailing into. Surrounded by lobster pots and totally exposed at the depths that we needed to safely anchor and with a 1.5 knot northbound current to boot, we had to hang out for a little bit and decide whether the boys were gonna make it  to land or spend the night on the boat with us and catch a ride home from the next anchorage south of there.

The boys heading in in the dinghy

The boys heading in in the dinghy

Long story short, we made it in safely and were able to anchor without any drama. The ground had really great holding and it wasn’t too much trouble for us to stop for half an hour. So that we did and got them off to their camp and us on our way right as the sun was setting over the ocean in front of us.

When the sun rose the next day we were well on our way to our approach at Abreojos, our next anchorage. Abreojos is the closest anchorage to Laguna San Ignacio, a well known calving ground for Grey Whales and the home of Ecotourismo Kuyima, who we are meeting up with to try and make a short video. It is also the home of some of the leading whale researchers on the coast and we are hoping to meet up with them as well. We will tell you more about all of this when we finish the project soon.

Chris hoisting the spinnaker for the first time

Chris hoisting the spinnaker for the first time

On the way into Abreojos, the winds were light and we decided to break out our spinnaker for the first time. We were sort of worried about this sail ahead of time because people like to tell you horror stories about the wind picking up and not being able to get it down, but we found this sail to be really easy to raise, douse and sail. Also, if the wind picks up, and we can’t get the sock down, we can just release the sheet, or even the foot since its not attached to roller furling, and let it flop in the wind till we can get it in the boat. All in all, we love this sail and are excited to use it in light winds down the rest of the coast. Mostly because it’s a rainbow.

Dolphins hunting the anchorage at Abreojos

Dolphins hunting the anchorage at Abreojos

Eventually we made it into Abreojos, Spanish for “Open Eyes” since it has a lot of tretcherous sailing obstacles and has sunk a few boats, with out to much unexpected hassle. There were a thousand pots all over the place. You do have to bob and weave around rocks and sholes. But the benefit, at least this time of year, is that you are literally surrounded by Grey Whales the whole way in. They were breaching clear out of the water. Amazing.

We pulled in, dropped our hook and made some dinner while dolphins hunted in the bay around us. At one point there was a large pod circling and hunting right around our boat. As we sat there, staring out our galley window at the fins cruising by, we could distinctly here all their whistles, clicks and calls through the hull of our boat, clear as day.

Stay tuned for that video in the next few weeks. Out.

Sunset at Abreojos, Baja California Sur

Sunset at Abreojos, Baja California Sur

 


Comments (2)

  1. Mom

    We can’t get enough of this…we are amazed and Mike is so jealous we can hardly wait for the next installment. Living the retired life in Florida but seeing the adventure through your camera, your experience and your amazing choice of words to express it. We love you. XXOO

    Reply

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