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S/V Silent Sun | All Rights Reserved

ABOUT US


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In January of 2014 we set out on our 37-foot sailboat, Silent Sun, to explore our oceans and document, through video and photography, what makes them special as well as the people who are working hard to protect them.

This idea was born, first, out of a love for the sea, but it is also spurned by our concern.

In recent years, we have been hearing so much about how precariously close the oceans are to being changed forever by the forces of human development. We want to see what it is that we may be on the verge of losing and who, if anybody, is doing anything about it.

Commercial fishing is driving species such as sharks and tuna onto the endangered species list.  Carbon emissions are causing the acidity of the ocean to rise and threaten reefs worldwide. Developments are constantly encroaching on the mangrove forests that both revitalize and sustain their local marine environment.

All of this sounds grim. So why bother?

In recent years, we have been hearing so much about how precariously close the oceans are to being changed forever by the forces of human development. We want to see what it is that we may be on the verge of losing and who, if anybody, is doing anything about it.

We believe that any successful conservation program has to be designed within the incredibly complicated parameters of the environment that the program focuses on, the people who live within or around it, and the businesses and economic realities of the communities that may depend on those environmental resources to survive. The key to balancing out all these opposing forces, in our opinion, is education and communication.

By educating local communities on how and why their local resources are threatened, they can best decide how to protect it. By educating businesses on the true value of these ecosystems, they can understand new ways of making profit and see the significance in developing sustainable practices. By opening strong lines of communication between communities, businesses and scientists, we can develop stewards who will protect their own precious ecosystems for years to come.

We intend to highlight the projects that we feel best represent these ideals and practices in order to inspire others to do the same. We also hope that these projects and findings will bring optimism back into our view of the ocean and its future.



Jessica Newley
Photographer

 

Jessica is an award winning underwater photographer and environmental educator. For the past five years, she has focused on visiting and documenting some of the most fragile marine environments in the world. Her images convey a passion for her subjects and allow her viewers to peer into the marine environment that makes up nearly three quarters of our planet’s surface. Whether it is through photography, film, or education, Jessica is striving tirelessly to convey the beautiful yet fragile nature of our seas and inspire in others the same desire she has to protect it.

 


 

Christopher Newley
Handy Man

In the past five years, Chris has explored deep sea caves in the Red Sea, swam with massive schools of Hammerhead sharks in Sudan, dove some of the deepest shipwrecks of the Puget Sound and British Columbia, and navigated the world’s largest underwater cave systems in the Yucatan peninsula. Throughout all of this, Chris is rarely caught without a camera in hand and has filmed underwater in places many other divers could not go. He has recently ventured out to document the magical landscapes of the Pacific Northwest.


Martini
Captain

aka The Mango, Tini, Sausage Paws, Cap’n, Teddy Bear, Butterball, Teen, Niener, Manimal Martini and all his aka’s is the mold of this boat. Having a good piece of fur around while out on the sea is priceless, and just look at the smile. This salty dog has been around for 11 years and looks forward to his retirement, cruising the great blue, onboard Silent Sun.


 


What is it that confers the noblest delight? What is that which swells a man’s breast with pride above that which any other experience can bring to him? Discovery! To know that you are walking where none others have walked; that you are beholding what human eye has not see before; that you are breathing a virgin atmosphere. To give birth to an idea — an intellectual nugget, right under the dust of a field that many a brain-plow had gone over before. To be the first — that is the idea. To do something, say something, see something, before anybody else — these are the things that confer a pleasure compared with other pleasures are tame and commonplace, other ecstasies cheap and trivial. Lifetimes of ecstasy crowded into a single moment.

”Mark
Innocents

All that is gold does not glitter,

Not all those who wander are lost…

J.R.R. Tolkien
The Lord Of The Rings